Tech news that you need to read: software patents, German link war, YouTube as a mobster and a confession from a tech journalist

Ok. The title might be longer than the actual blog content, but who cares? I have a huge stack of blog posts ready so I need to cut to the chase and let you know that you need to read these articles to get a better view of what the web is going through right now.

So, here are these news in a couple of phrases:
1. “Abstract ideas” cannot be used for software patenting anymore – while this ruling is fairly narrow it gets us closer to shutting down software patents sometime in the future. Basically, the US supreme Court has decided that abstract ideas that are created into a computer environment cannot be patented. That means that something like an escrow, a means of enforcing the settlement of debts in a multi-party financial transaction, cannot be a software patent. Finally!

2. There is a German war against the link in Google’s SERPs – Jeff Jarvis reports that the German publishers want to ask Google for some money because Google is showing the links to their websites in its SERPs. Do you know what? Why doesn’t Google simply deleted those guys from the index? Fair and square.

3. Youtube is behaving like a mobster – independent music creators are asked to sign some contracts with YouTube and pay YouTube some money if they want to see their videos online. Bad, YouTube, bad. Why? Because YouTube already has a ton of gains from the visitors that come to the site, search for the independent singer and then make views which, in turn, can be monetized via the ads YouTube runs. I say that the independent producers should NOT give in.

4. An ex-Venture Beat journalist confesses: it was hard, but I learned many things – she wrote almost 1700 blog posts for Venture Beat in more than 2 years. That is a lot considering she had to do a lot of meeting and phone calls each day and she had to write about five blog posts a day. That is a lot. She gave some pieces of advice: when you want to contact a journalist or a blogger for that matter, make sure you have something really interesting to tell.

5. Bonus: All About Yahoo’s DMARC Reject Policy – DMRC rehjection policy means that if someone sends you an email using an @yahoo.com email address and the server that sends that email is NOT an Yahoo server, then all major email providers will simply reject it. This will reduce a big chunk of the spam that is out there and that uses @yahoo.com addresses. A good thing, but with some downfalls. Read the full article to know more.

That’s it for now, folks.

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